Tuesday, December 06, 2016

State-themed North Carolina FC shoots for MLS status


After a decade in existence, the Carolina RailHawks soccer club in Cary, N.C., is no more -- well, sorta. On December 6, 2016, it was announced that the club is now known as North Carolina FC. And in addition to the rebranding, owner Steve Malik stated that he is "aggressively" pursuing a new downtown Raleigh stadium that will hold more than 20,000 people, and that he plans for the team to be part of Major League Soccer in the next 12-18 months.


The look and branding of "NCFC" has a distinct North Carolina feel, from the colors down to the symbolism, which we have touched on before here. From the team's website:

NC Star:
The white five-point star sits at the peak of NCFC’s crest and is a stark symbol of the star on the North Carolina state flag. ...
The Triangle Area:
The lower right point of the NCFC star, in the shape of the geographical Triangle area, stands alone to place emphasis on the club’s location. ...
Wordmark:
“North Carolina” sits in the center of the badge in white letters. The proprietary font titled Sir Walter honors the state capital’s namesake, Sir Walter Raleigh.

Football Club Wings:
The “FC” acronym lies between two airplane wings as an ode to North Carolina’s motto: “First in Flight.” Brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright invented and flew the first successful airplane, the Flyer, from atop of Kill Devil Hill in Kitty Hawk, NC in 1903. ...
Atlantic Blue:
Representing loyalty and stability, the crest’s predominant color, Atlantic Blue, lays the framework of the NCFC logo. Known for its iconic lighthouses, the North Carolina coast meets with the Atlantic Ocean for over 300 miles. Blue is one of the two official state colors and is the vertical field on the left of the state flag.
Cardinal Red:
Named for the North Carolina state bird, Cardinal Red incorporates the energy and passion of the club’s identity and fan base into the NCFC crest. Red is the second official state color and is found in the horizontal bar of the North Carolina state flag.
Southern Gold:
Southern Gold encircles the NCFC crest and is concentrated within the lower right point of the star and airplane wings. The color honors the state’s history of abundant gold resources and athletic excellence. The discovery of a 17-pound gold nugget in Cabarrus County, NC sparked the North Carolina gold rush in 1799, boosting the state’s enterprise into the 19th century. ...
Oak City Acorn:
The crest’s shield resembles the shape of an acorn, representing the club’s allegiance to the state’s capital affectionately known as the City of Oaks because of the oak-lined streets in the heart of Raleigh. As the seed of the deep-rooted oak tree, the acorn symbolizes the growth and ambition that NCFC possesses.
From Peak to Point:
The top point of the five-point star creates a peak that epitomizes the state’s vast mountainous region. With the highest mountain peaks east of the Rockies in the Appalachian Mountains, to the state’s seven world-renowned coastal lighthouses, North Carolina is a state that is diverse, unique and unparalleled.

Seems like the state is pretty well covered. About the only thing missing is a way to incorporate the likeness of Andy Griffith.

In all seriousness, kudos to NCFC for really embracing the state -- whether you are jazzed about the team name or not.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

We still love you, N.C.

The Old North State has been taking a serious beating of late thanks to HB2 and its fallout. Whether you are for or against the bill, it's hard to argue against this: it's been a public relations AND a financial nightmare for North Carolina. It may take a while to recover.

One positive (if you can call it that) that has come out of this is the level of praise for the state and for its people that has come from different corners of the world. For instance, musician Henry Rollins wrote this:

"It is almost impossible to describe how beautiful North Carolina is. For a few summers, I was shipped off there to live in a tent at a summer camp. Each day, we were given chores. Milking cows, feeding chickens, getting beetles off the vegetables. Since the late 1960s, I have always had an affection for N.C."

So as our state continues to take a beating, here is a simple stream of consciousness list of the things that are good and beautiful about the "Vale of Humility." Feel free to add to this list. There's no way to accurately capture all the superlatives. But, by God, I'm willing to try.  #westillloveNC


  • Barbecue
  • Blue Ridge Mountains
  • Blue Ridge parkway
  • Outer Banks
  • Crystal Coast
  • Char-Grill
  • Asheville
  • Avett Brothers
  • The Connells
  • Red clay
  • Red Clay Ramblers
  • Cheerwine
  • Pepsi
  • Grandfather Mountain
  • Tweetsie Railroad
  • Wine
  • Craft beer
  • Furniture
  • Sherry's Bakery in Dunn
  • Our colleges and universities (public and private)
  • Our teachers
  • Cape Hatteras
  • Our State magazine
  • Big city downtowns and small town Main Streets
  • The suburbs, too!
  • Sugar Mountain
  • Music festivals
  • Waterfalls
  • Grey squirrels
  • White squirrels
  • Cardinals
  • Venus fly trap
  • The Lost Colony
  • The Greensboro Four
  • College basketball
  • Carolina Hurricanes
  • Charlotte Hornets
  • Carolina Panthers
  • Golf courses
  • Blowing Rock
  • Tim McLaurin
  • Lee Smith
  • James Taylor
  • Biltmore Estate
  • Grove Park Inn
  • Wilmington
  • Bald Head Island
  • N.C. Zoo
  • Pine trees
  • Dogwoods
  • Lake Lure
  • New Bern
  • Bath
  • Blackbeard
  • Angus Barn
  • Carowinds
  • Chimney Rock
  • Fairy crosses
  • Emeralds
  • Brown Mountain Lights
  • Chatham County Line
  • Ocracoke
  • Andy Griffith
  • Mount Airy
  • Link Wray
  • Carl Sandburg
  • Michael Jordan
  • Ava Gardner
  • Cape Lookout
  • Krispy Kreme
  • David Thompson
  • Halifax Resolves
  • Bojangles
  • Red wolves
  • Durham Bulls
  • Mount Mitchell


#westillloveNC



Thursday, March 24, 2016

Urban-rural-suburban chasm redux

This deserves repeating. With absolutely no additional commentary. Seriously. None.

The push by Republican leaders is the latest front in a battle in the Old North State between liberal-leaning cities and more conservative areas of the state, and it’s also the latest front in a national battle over LGBT rights. ...

The state is deeply divided between liberal cities and conservative rural areas, and with few prospects to take back control in Raleigh, progressives have looked to local government as a way to enact change.